Louisiana Property Tax

 

Louisiana Property Tax Information

Appeal Tax

During a period of 15 days between August 1st and September 15th, the assessment lists of each parish are open for public inspection. The assessor will publish in the local newspaper which two weeks apply to his/her office. During this period, taxpayers should check the values on their property, and discuss this with the assessor. If there is a disagreement, and the taxpayer wishes to protest the value, the taxpayer must at that time fill out a form “Notice of Appeal Request For Board of Review” (Form 3101), and schedule an appearance before the parish Board of Review for hearing(s) held for this purpose. The date(s) of hearing(s) of the Board of Review in your parish will also be published by the assessor in the local newspaper.The Board of Review office in your parish will determine if any changes should be made to the assessment values in question. If either the assessor or the taxpayer is not satisfied with the determination of the Board of Review, either may obtain from the Board, an Appeal Form (Form 3103.A) for further review by the Louisiana Tax Commission. The Louisiana Tax Commission will consider any and all appeals timely filed in hearings that are open to the public.

Those considering appeals are encouraged to consult the assessor, parish board of review and the Louisiana Tax Commission for specific procedures, dates, times, and places of all hearings.

 

When Should I Discuss My Assessment with the Assessor’s Office?

Each year during August 1st through September 15th the assessment rolls are open for public inspection and for discussion of the assessment with the assessor’s office. This is the time to discuss your assessment. It also is the time that a taxpayer can legally file a protest to the assessment if a settlement with the assessor cannot be reached. Many taxpayers wait until the tax bills are sent each year to discuss their assessment. The assessor will discuss your assessment at that time but a property owner cannot legally file a protest at that time

 

When Should I File A Homestead Exemption Application?

In order to qualify for homestead exemption, one must own and occupy the house as his/her primary residence. Regardless of how many houses are owned, no one is entitled to more than one homestead exemption, which is a maximum of $7,500 of assessed value. If you change primary residence, you must notify the assessor. It is advisable to go in to the assessor’s office and apply for homestead exemption as soon as you purchase and occupy your home.

 

What Are the Qualifications to Apply for the Special Assessment Level for 65 And Older?

A Special Assessment applies to the homestead of person s who are 65 years of age and older if the adjusted gross household income is below a certain level. For the tax year 2005, that level will be $56, 744. The level may change form year to year, so it is advisable to check with your assessor’s office to determine whether you qualify. This special assessment will freeze the assessed value of the homestead for as long as the applicant owns and resides in the home and income does not exceed the maximum allowed. This Special assessment level is lost if improvements in excess of 25% of the home’s value are added. Proof of age and income is required at the time the application is signed. The freeze extends to a surviving spouse who is at least 55 years of age, and meets all other qualifications.

 

What Is The Relationship Between Market Value And Assessed Value For Property In Louisiana?

In Louisiana, the classification of property subject to ad valorem taxation and the percentage of fair market value applicable to each classification for the purpose of determining assessed value are as follows:

 

 

Bona fide agricultural, horticultural, marsh and timberlands as defined by Revenue Statues shall be assessed for tax purposes at 10% of use value rather than market value. The Louisiana Tax Commission sets these values.

 

What Is Meant By Millage Rates Or Mills?

Millage is the percentage of value that is used in calculating taxes. A mill is defined as 1/10 of 1 percent and is multiplied by the assessed value after any exemptions have been subtracted to calculate the taxes. For example: if the tax rate is 150 mills and total assessed value is $10,000 with no exemptions, the taxes would be calculated as $10,000 x .150 = $1,500.00. If for the same house you had a homestead exemption the taxes would be: $10,000 - $7,500(H.E.) = $2,500.00 x .150 = $375.00 in taxes. This demonstrates the importance of filing a homestead exemption


Louisiana Counties

 
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